UK Go Challenge

UK Go Challenge
ukgochallenge
Contributor:
Tony Atkins
Organization:
British Go Association
Edition:
2007

Description

The Uk Go Challenge for schools is a competition aimed both at getting existing school clubs involved in competition more and at promoting Go to schools where Go is not yet played. The Challenge was invented in 2004 by the BGA Youth Development Officer, Paul Smith, and based on the succeful UK Chess Challenge that has been running since 1996.
The format of the Challenge involves running a heat at each school, the best players from the heats taking part in national finals. On submitting their entry for 25 pounds (40 euro), the school receives a Tournament Pack. This contains everything they need to run their heat: Go rules and leaflet, tournament rules and guidance, draw cards and score sheet, prizes. Each heat is five games which can be held on five days or just one as suits. Players score a point for playing each game as well as an extra 2 points for winning. Scoring 8 points wins a player an additional prize (a furry Go stone bug) and scoring 11 points wins an additional prize (Go fridge magnet). The top player wins the overall prize, such as a baseball cap, FridgeGo set, Go fan or Hikaru book. Scoring 8 is enough to enter the finals, but the top player in each of several age groups qualify as well.
Schools that have not played Go before can apply for a Go Evaluation Pack. This costs 5 pounds (7.5 euro) and contains Go leaflets, a pricelist for equipement and a card starter board with flat plastic Go stones. They can also get access to one of the BGA’s volunteer teachers or a professional Go Teacher. Promotion of the challenge and the pack has been kindly done by the Chess Challenge, as the Go Challenge happens in the summer term after the Chess Challenge and so does not clash.
The finals are held in the middle of Engeland at the end of July. In 2005 the number of players at the finals more than doubled to 46. They competed in various age and gender categories for valuable prizes donated by LG Electronics. Most of the 20 heats sent players to the finals. In addition in the Autumn the first Geographic Go Gala was held in Cambridge, offering a day of teaching and competiton for schools in a region. In 2006 more than 500 school children were involved.
For further details see our website.

Objectives

To promote Go in schools, especially among schools already with game clubs (eg. Chess).

Realisation

New schools have evaluated Go, played in the Challenge and started Go Clubs. Over 500 Children have take part.

Resources

Human resources: Challenge Coordinator -develops packs & sends to entrants/enquirers, -and runs the Challenge. Local teachers have visited schools.
Financial resources: First Year cost 1500 euro to set up. Second year only cost was advertising as packs are self-financing & finals had a good sponsor.

Possibilities to copy this project

The Challenge can be copied by any country but most will not have advertising via a Chess Challenge so will have to find other ways of advertising.

Go on TV

Go on TV
maus
Contributor:
Go-Verband NRW e.V. (Monika Reimpell)
Organization:
German Go Association (Deutscher Go-Bund)
Edition:
2003

Description

After a whole day of shooting, three days of cutting and a day of sound production the film was ready for broadcasting. Currently, we are supporting primary schools to incorporate the TV spot on Go as well as an introduction to Go and the Asian culture into their classes.In Germany, there is a famous TV program for children called “Sendung mit der Maus”. For more than 30 years now, an animated cartoon mouse explains childrenSendungmetdermaus2 aged 3 to 99 how the world works. On a weekend in September 2002, the mouse learned how to play Go! In a TV spot of six to seven minutes, Florian Chamot, a then nine year old Go child from Cologne, Germany, explains to the mouse team and all children watching the TV program how to catch stones and to build territory. And he showed the children that Go is a game with very simple rules where children can easily win against adults! The TV program was produced by the Westdeutscher Rundfunk (the main TV station ofNorth Rhine-Westphalia) with the assistance of Go players from Cologne in summer 2001.
The first contacts with the WDR have been made through two channels: First, Kalli Balduin, the “head” of the Berlin children Go activities, wrote an eMail to the “Maus”, suggesting to feature Go in the “Sendung mit der Maus”, as it is a game with very simple rules that even children can easily learn. Second, our long-term relationship with the “Museum of Eastern Asian Art” in Cologne, where the Cologne Go Tournament takes place each year, led to our involvement in the actual production. The WDR (which is located in Cologne) contacted the museum, as they thought of producing part of the film in the museum, and the museum staff arranged with me for a child that could show Go in the film. From then on, we worked in close relationship with the WDR personnel, who even visited the Cologne Go club to learn Go themselves :-)

Objectives

Spread Go. Make Go better known among children and their parents and teachers. Tell children that Go is an interesting game, that it is fun to play Go, that it is easy to learn Go, and that Go is a game where children have a good chance to win against adults.

Realisation

To a high degree. Most people who saw the spot on TV agree that it is well designed to raise children’s interest in Go. In addition, the TV spot was broadcasted in the main German TV program (ARD), where it has been seen by over one million households, and it has been replayed about ten times over the week in regional TV programs.

Resources

Manpower: Florian Chamot and three adult Go players as well as a Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) TV team for one day of shooting, two adult Go players as well as a WDR TV team for four days of cutting and sound production. Of course, further resources are involved in the support of primary schools.
Go players gave assistence to the WDR in several areas:
(1) We gave them an introduction on how to play Go, so that they got an idea of the game.
(2) We discussed with them the film-script (“Drehbuch”). What needs to be told? What should be left out? Films for the “Sendung mit der Maus” may only last 3-7 minutes and are supposed to be understandable by children of kindergarten age!
(3) We arranged with them for the child to explain Go (Florian Chamot) and arranged for playing material like Go boards and stones.
(4) We supported the production of the film (e.g. recorded games, supported correct rule explanations). To have their films authentic, the WDR does not give scripts etc. to the children, but lets them explain things spontaneously. On the other hand, time and film material is limited, so that it is crucial to find the right balance between what can be left as is and what must be filmed again.
(5) We advised them during cutting. Things to watch for here are e.g. that the go game is shown in correct order and that no scenes from different games are mixed up.
(6) We advised them during tone production.
Things to watch for here is that the Go explanations are correct and that an appropriate terminology is used.
Financial resources: Euro 200, the rest was covered by the WDR.

Possibilities to copy this project

The “Sendung mit der Maus” is also broadcasted in many other European countries. Negotiations with the Westdeutscher Rundfunk and the local TV stations in the other countries will be needed to initiate broadcasting of the TV spot on Go in the other countries. Go associations should offer their assistance in the translation of the spot and should arrange the provision of local contact information to the TV station in their country.

Go Memory Problems

Go Memory
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Contributor:
Kali Balduin
Organization:
Edition:
2001

Description

The idea of memory cards highlighted here is actually part of series of promotion activities and ideas. It consists of memory-card-sets with pairs of a problem and a solution. It is designed to memorize patterns of play and possibly a different set for each grade-level could be realised

Realisation

No realisation yet.

Resources

Low manpower, costs depend on quality.

Go Cases for School

Go Cases for School

Gocase

Contributor:
Thomas Nohr
Edition:
2001
Prize winner:
Encouragement Award

Description

A case with Go equipment: it contains 15 9×9-boards with stones of the normal size, rules and special instructions for the teacher. The instructions are written so that the teachers unfamiliar with Go can still use them.
The first issue was sponsored in 1997 by Stefan Liesegang in Berlin. In December 2000, out of 20 school that borrowed the case, 19 of them were still using them and didn’t want to pass them on to other schools.

Realisation

See above. In addition to the contents of the case, the strips by Andreas Fecke have been used.

Resources

Manpower: low
Costs: average (sponsored)

Golympics

Golympics
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Contributor:
Bart Caers
Organization:
Go Club Kempen/Geel
Edition:
2012

Description

Combining sports and Go in one whole outdoor project. Ideas at the moment: running, biking, swimming. For example: “Play a move then race to the clock”.

Objectives

To promote Go in a more active way and provide a fun challenge for all Go players.

Realisation

The event will preferably take place in a warmer season and be done in public, with spectators.
We need to promote the event and motivate Go players. The ideas are still being developed.

Resources

Sporting materials (be available at my home), Go playing materials (preferably magnetic go boards as they are easier to combine with the sports; digital clocks), motivated Go players.

Possibilities of copying this project

It is relatively easy to copy this project and organize this sort of event in other countries. It will probably attract media which is another advantage of this project.

Contact information

caers.bart@live.be

Project Online Roleplay Game

Project Online Roleplay Game

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Contributor:
Janine Böhme
Organization:
Edition:
2012

Description

The basic idea of the project is to make use of the popularity of online roleplay games to propagate the game of Go and also to help beginners on their way to ~10k. Any financial profit that might be generated will be used to support other Go projects as a recreational sport, especially in the youth sector.
In the beginning every player will go through an interview which will determine their character (student, fighter/warrior, adventurer/archaeologist, storyteller/guy with amnesia) and their starting point. Each character has an own story line, own game object and specific options to style their character (appearance). The characters’ paths will intersect (and there might be the possibility to change to another character at some points, it is probably the easiest to transform to student).
The Go content is the same for all characters on the respective level, although the ‘wrapping’ might vary. To reach the next level the player needs to solve certain quests, puzzles and/or tests whereas on the lower levels there are level up points or tests which enable the player to skip almost entire levels (for players who possess prior knowledge of Go).
Upon reaching a new level the possibilities increase, e.g. new board sizes, rule sets and time systems, Go variants, items/equipment and activation of new areas.
There are two currencies (to be designated). Currency A can be earned by solving Go problems and currency B by solving quests/riddles and exploring the online world etc.
The currencies can be used to pay for accessories, equipment, housing and furniture, Go material, information, club membership, tournament entrance fees etc.
Players can form clubs which can compete with each other and the like. From the club funds they can rent rooms or buildings, hire Go tutors, organize tournaments and finance other activities.
The different realms may take place in different dimensions and ages – such as Asia at Shusaku’s time, an alien planet somewhere in the universe, a parallel Fantasy dimension and so on.
As many aspects of Go as possible will be included, such as rules, lore, Go terms/foreign languages, philosophy, Go problems (life & death, shapes, best move), theories to each aspect of the game, standard sequences, tools such as counting liberties in semeai, pro games, …

Objectives

Every time I gave courses for beginners over several weeks or months I encountered the same problems:
– Playing once a week isn’t really enough to improve ones Go-skills and there are often longer breaks due to holiday etc.
– Most participants don’t like solving Go-problems all too much.
– Some participants join the course later and miss therefore the subjects of the previous lessons.
– The level and the pace of improvement varies significantly from person to person, which makes compromises necessary in the teaching content, methods and speed.
In order to enable beginners to make best use of their skills and talents, we want to create an interactive platform where beginners can learn and train Go to their heart’s content and at their one pace.
It is not our goal to replace e. g. Go clubs and teachers in schools, but rather to support them and motivate the beginners to solve Go problems and learn more about Go than one does normally on Go servers.

Realisation

So far we framed the rough direction in which the game will develop. We founded the association “AdYouKi Go” which will help to handle administrative issues such as copyright, sponsors and finances in general.
Now we need skilled programmers and motivated Go players who help to amass tens of thousands of Go problems, background information on history, philosophies, etiquette, professional players as well as stories/ legends, actual news and of course Go theory to all game aspects.

Resources

For now we need a lot of people, especially programmers but also graphic artists, musicians, translators, Go teachers and so on.
In a while we will also need servers to run the game and sponsors to handle thereby incurring costs.

Possibilities of copying this project

So far we want to run the game in German and English, but other languages shall follow. The game will probably be licensed under GNU (open source) so that there is the possibility to copy and improve it later e.g. by changing the graphic from 2D to 3D.

Universal 3d chess

Universal 3d chess
u3dc-1024x607

Contributor:
Hubele Hervé
Organization:
Edition:
2012

Description

I’ve started this project a few years ago to teach go to children. I wanted to write a program that replay go games in 3D and nothing more. So i took the 3D Engine i was working on and used it to write the first release. But very quicly i saw that i could write something with very cute visual effects like complex camera movements, nice shading and lighting etc… So i decide to take a few month to write it during my free time.
The goal was very clear : Play chess, go, shogi, xiangqi etc… At the same time in the same program, localy or online. I started with go just because i’m a go player. Here you’ll find the complete feature list – Now this project is running not so badly for Go. I just need to add online games. And more funny features.

Contact Information

Cambridge Youth Project

Cambridge Youth Project

Prizewinner

Contributor:
Paul Smith
Organization:
Cambridge Youth Go Project
Edition:
2007

Description

The Cambridge Youth GoProject was set up around ten years ago with the aim of increasing the number of local children actively playing Go.
The first part of our strategy was to start a club for juniors to play Chess and Go. The idea was to work in cooperation with the local Chess club who also wanted to encourage junior players; also there is a lot of interest in Chess in our target age group due to the success of the UK Chess Challenge.The club is a big success and we recently had 34 players competing in a Go tournament at the club.
The second part of our strategy was to make contact with as many parents and teachers as possible in order to get new opportunities to introduce juniors to Go. We did this via the club itself, but also by running an annual tournament and by running Go teaching stalls at Chess events. This has also been a success and has resulted in Go clubs or Chess & Go clubs starting up in half a dozen schools so far in Cambridge. The most successful of these, Milton School, recently ran a Go tournament in the school with 39 players.
We have made sure that children who have started playing Go keep their enthusiasm by arranging a range of tournament and teaching events for them. Recently this has included a successful teaching day (organised jointly with the BGA) where we made use of a local venue with Internet access to introduce children to various online Go resources. This included playing a team game on KGS which was projected on a big screen.
Throughout we have taken care to get as many as possible local enthusiastic Go players involved. In 2007 around 10-12 local players have helped with the juniors in some way. We maintain a Yahoo Group to keep in touch with these volunteers and to allow them all to put in their ideas.
We started off with some money from the Ing Foundation. We have managed to attract sponsorship and also individual donations to support our work. And the money we have brought in from clubs and tournaments has so far exceeded the cost of running them.
Over 100 children are regularly playing Go in our area as a result of our project. We are confident that this number will grow.
We feel that our ideas could be taken up in other places. If there were other similar projects in other parts of the UK, for example, we think that the number of junior Go players in the country could grow rapidly.
You can read a provisional report of activities from 2007 here. It includes some photographs.

Objectives

The main objective of our project was to get more juniors in the Cambridge area playing Go. Our main target is the 7-11 age band. We estimate there are about 10,000 children of this age in the Cambridge area and we were aiming first to get 1% of them playing Go and then see if we could increase this to 2%-3% which would bring Go fairly much level with Chess.

Realisation

We have reached the first stage of our objectives in that there are over 100 children in the Cambridge area now regularly playing Go. We are confident that we can continue to increase this number.

Resources

Human resources: We estimate that around 20 local Go players have been involved in the project during the life of the project. In addition to this, Chess players and parents have helped with some of the events that we have organised.
The current level of input from local Go players is probably in the range 10-20 person hours per week in total. We feel that one of the reasons that our project is sustainable is that no individual person has had to put in a very great amount of their own time.
Financial resources: We had an initial spend of around 150-200 pounds on Go equipment. We also spent money on photocopying teaching materials and on buying some Go books. Each year at the start of the school year we produce advertising material for our Chess & Go club. Part of this is to produce around 6000 flyers for local schools. At commercial rates this would cost us almost 200 pounds but we have usually been able to find some way getting them produced or at a cheap rate.
At the start of our project we received an Ing grant which more than covered our start up costs. Clubs and tournaments that we have run have in general been able to cover their own costs by the amount of money raised by subscriptions or entry fees.

Possibilities to copy this project

We feel that it should be possible to reproduce our project both in other parts of the UK and in other European countries.
We recently produced some advice for people in other parts of the UK who might be interested in starting up a similar project. This has been posted by the BGA on their site. We hope that we might be able to give some financial assistance and other specific help and advice to people starting any similar project.
Some of the specific ways we have carried out our project (for example, how we have advertised our activities to schools) may have to be modified for other countries, but we feel that the overall project idea should apply equally well in other parts of Europe.
Our project has not involved any large financial risk nor the necessity to find particular individuals with a very large amount of spare time; for this reason we feel it should not be too hard to reproduce elsewhere.

Hyperlink

The website of Cambridge Junior Chess & Go Club: http://www.chessgo.org.uk

Book on Go for Elementary School

Book on Go for Elementary School

book_illustration1

Contributor:
Tibor Rapai
Organization:
Hungarian Go Association
Edition:
2003

Description

While being responsible for international affairs within the Hungarian Go Association executive, I am starting some personal activities now based on my Japanese knowledge and inspirations from several persons around me. It is going to be a project of wide effect and I need your help to be able to publish the ever first book on Go in Hungary. In May 2002 we had a group of Japanese players visiting Budapest GP, lead by Nihon-Kiin 6dan professional player Masaaki Hirano sensei. He helped us with instructions and game commentaries during the tournament, and we experienced his teaching style and warm, informal personal attitude to be very close to us. His ideas were understandable for weak kyu players as well while analysing top amateur players’ games. The atmosphere was similar to that of Saijo sensei’s lessons during the European Go Congresses.

 

That time I heard from Hirano sensei about his new series of Go teaching books, the first of which has just come out from print in Japan (the date of publishing is 2002 September 15). When we spoke about situation of Go in Hungary, I asked him about a possibility to translate his book into Hungarian. Then he kindly offered his help to publish the book in Hungary.

 

Later I have received both the book and the material on CD from him. I have just started the translation now, and my plan (based on talks with a journalists knowing well such things) is to reach all Hungarian elementary schools countrywide with Go promotion material. It can be done using the School-book Publishing Company’s help. They send regularly a list of available books to all schools, the books are ordered by the schools simply writing the necessary numbers into the boxes on the list, very easily. The promotion material will include a free flyleaf offering the book, sent together with the list as follows:

 

A free flyleaf in colour and high quality, in final print two sided A4 size, the first page containing:
1. Introduction of Hirano sensei’s book: Winning and losing patterns in Go (with picture on the left)
2. Description of the board, instructions how to build a paper board oneself (picture of a board on the right)
3. The basic rules of Go (all small paragraphs with a funny caricature connecting Go to real life or other sport, eg. illustrating black and white consequent moves with black and white sumo wrestler figures standing on stones)
4. Short introduction (in one sentence for each) the versions of playing: Atari-go, equal game and handicap go, Japanese counting.

 

The second page of the flyleaf will introduce some basic techniques briefly, also with simple diagrams:
1. Catching (groups of) stones with ladder, geta, eyes, false eyes – cutting, living groups, ko rule
2. Basic patterns of connected stones, extensions from groups and vital points to attack groups
3. Finally list of go resurces on the Web, HGA, EGF, and my own home page with online ordering.
Of course these basics would fill up several books separately if discussed in details with exercises. My basic aim is to reach, with series of visually understandable definitions, the level where the book starts. I have also in my mind that such information is available already from several sources. For example there is a small guide in the Go sets other HGA members keep selling, and good teaching material on HGA’s home page. Also Hirano sensei plans to write an introductory book within his series.

 

I think the Winning and losing patterns is a book highly needed both by our active players and the beginners, because it is speaking in easily understandable terms about the direction of the play. This way it can give not only useful knowledge but basic thinking about Go play for all of us. Such a book represents value and can be used by all players or becoming players. I plan to sell it on a minimum price, which covers the costs of printing and distribution. I need financial aid from the award to be able to print out this flyer and the book in nice quality. Then the future – surely quite limited – income from selling the book will be the basis to publish the next ones and making further steps.

Objectives

Introducing the game of Go using the school-book publishing channels to all elementary schools in Hungary. With ordering the book, using Web resources, and ordering or self-making Go sets there can self-supported go circles emerge around interested teachers. Such groups can give place for go teaching courses held by members of HGA later. I am also thinking about showing Hikaru no Go video series during go courses in schools to generate high interest among the pupils. Hikaru is proved to be a big success in Japan already. Attaching Hungarian subtitles for the series would be a manageable work in size; I have already contacted Ms. Rina Yamamoto asking about the possible solution regarding copyright.

Realisation

I have started already the translation of Hirano sensei’s book and collecting material for the flyer. Of course the contents of both will be checked by a top dan player before publishing, I plan to ask Tibor Pocsai 6dan, our former European champion for this task. The basic thing I would like to add, that I don’t want to get money from the award only for promises. I need your help only when the book gets ready for printing, so – in case you think my project deserves supporting with the help of the award – I can present you the electronic material before the transfer of money!

Resources

Until now only own resources and the generous help of Masaaki Hirano sensei.

Possibilities to copy this project

I think each country can move ahead with promotion in this way, maybe many did similarly already. My key ideas are using school-book distribution channel, free introduction flyleaf with caricatures, instructions how to make paper Go set, easy book (and Go set) ordering (through the school-book publisher and on Web), then helping Go circles combining usual teaching methods and Hikaru no Go.

Go in education

Go in education

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Contributor:
Marc Gonzalez Carnicer
Organization:
Moyo Go Institute
Prize winner:
Encouragement Award 2003

Description

This project consists on a set of materials and services that attempt to introduce the game of go in the Catalan educational system. The materials are documents (bureaucratic and didactic) and beginners go sets; the services are mainly support activities and teachers training. This project has been designed to maximize the results obtained by a small group of volunteers in a ‘small’ country, where availability and continuity of go players and teachers can not be guaranteed. To ensure this continuity, schools are offered the game of go as both a curricular activity and an after school program.
The Catalan Government official curriculum book (where all teachers must base their courses) has been analyzed and from there samples have been extracted for a wide range of subjects (maths, sports, history, geography, etc.) and ages using the game of go as a base. A set of documents containing proposals for courses is therefore offered. Besides the contents and procedures related to every course, another set of documents informs schools about the paradox that is how easy it is to learn the game go and how difficult it is to play it well, which leads to the conclusion that at a first stage, go develops on children attention and self-steem. The documentation also contains the bureaucratic documents used in schools to approve the contents of a course. Moyo also provides support activities and services to the Educational community. The support activities we offer are many:
– Training ‘standard’ teachers into the game of go and the Yasuda-Shigeno teaching method.
– Giving lectures and presentations in any forum we are invited to. This year we have attended a sports symposium and the Board games in Academia colloquim, with Yuki Shigeno 2-dan. She also attended all the centres where go is being taught.
– Arranging gatherings. For the first time in years we have arranged a National youth and children tournament, which gathered 60 players from 3 different towns and 6 different schools. As a consequence of the apperance in local press of this event we have been requested to teach go in several schools. This year we expect to have young players from southern France in our tournament.
– Doing ourselves the actual teaching of children in after school programs.
– Personalized training and mentoring of children. For those children who wish to play more than in school we offer personalized training. We also expect to travel to the EYC. We have attended Cannes and Prague, we expect to go to Cannes this year.

Objectives

– introduction of go in schools, both as a curricular subject and an after school program
– set up a permanent framework of go promotions without being very dependant on the availability of go players. This is important in a small go community like the one in Barcelona.
– have a growing number of children who play go regularly
– provide support activities to schools and teachers willing to teach go to their students
– ease the bureaucratic work of teachers by providing the documents they need to introduce go in their centres

Realisation

The project started by Moyo is just starting. Most of the initial objectives have been accomplished, but now it is the time of growing and stabilizing. This means increasing the number of schools and towns where go is played. It is also desirable to increase the percentage of schools where go is offered as a curricular subject. Nowadays our services are even being offered through educational organisations who provide educational resources to schools. These organizations include an educational resources centre in the city of Barcelona, and an after school activity provider in the city of Sabadell. We have started positive exchanges with the Education department of the Barcelona Municipality.

Resources

The resources used by our project are not very high. However, in the initial phase we have used some extra work to set up the environment.
Manpower: – concept and idea : 10 h
– preparation of documents : 40 h
– attendance to demos and lectures : 400 h (during 4 years)
– web page : 50 h
Financial resources:
– setting up : 200 euro
– catalonia go children championship : 600 euro
– visit of Yuki Shigeno : 500 euro
– travel to Prague’s EYC : 400 euro
Until now all of these expenses have been covered by donations of the members of Moyo but the Spanish Go Association has committed to finance a part of our expenses

Possibilities to copy this project

We believe this project is perfectly portable to other countries. There is only the need to adapt the contents of the documents to the particularities of the destination Education system. All the documents and ideas we have used are available at our web site in catalan, english and spanish. We would also be happy to provide help and support to people willing to implement a similar project somewhere else.

Contact information

Moyo Go Institute
Address : Club d’escacs Vulca. c/ Julia Portet 15, principal
Postal address : PO box 33093, 08080 Barcelona (Spain)
Email address : imoyo@imoyo.org